CELEBRATION OF LIFE™ LUNCHEON 2018

2018 Community Gift to Breast Cancer Patients

Our 24th Celebration of Life luncheon was perfect in every way! Olympic Gold Medalist, and breast cancer survivor, Dorothy Hamill, who admitted she was nervous, had the crowd of almost 400,  eating out of her hand with her honest, warm delivery. Hamill spoke about her life in terms of “falling down and getting back up,” – from falling on ice, to getting divorced to surviving breast cancer.  Through her grit and positive outlook, Hamill has always “gotten up” and moved forward.

Our support of Eagle County residents who have been diagnosed with breast cancer continues this year with the 2018 donation of our new program, “Meals to Heal,” two weeks of dinners – created by Chef Weston Schroeder – to those beginning chemotherapy. We felt it would be a wonderful addition to our other significant gifts of a “Day to Play” as well as a “Shine On Bag” to those who have been diagnosed at the Shaw Regional Cancer Center.

The Vail Breast Cancer Awareness Group’s motto is “Live each day. Love each day.” And, through our efforts we hope that, in some way, we are making life easier for many.

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITY

We are pleased to announce that the Olympic Gold Medalist and breast cancer survivor, Dorothy Hamill, will be the featured speaker at our 24th Celebration of Life luncheon to be held at the Vail Marriott Resort and Spa on Friday, August 3, 2018. Hamill, whose trademark skating move, the “Hamill camel,” along with her signature bob haircut which went viral during the 1976 Olympics, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2008. Over the years she has been involved with many organizations, including the President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, the International Special Olympics and the American Cancer Society, advocating education for women. Hamill’s 2007 memoir, “A Skating Life: My Story,” has inspired many to pursue their dream.

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